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SOIL An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 1, issue 1
SOIL, 1, 147–171, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-1-147-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: An introduction to SOIL

SOIL, 1, 147–171, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-1-147-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Review article 05 Feb 2015

Review article | 05 Feb 2015

Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

C. L. Ping et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish as is (24 Dec 2014) by David Weindorf
ED: Publish as is (24 Dec 2014) by Eric C. Brevik(Executive Editor)
AR by Chien-Lu Ping on behalf of the Authors (20 Jan 2015)  Author's response
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
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Short summary
The huge carbon stocks found in soils of the permafrost region are important to the global climate system because of their potential to decompose and release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere upon thawing. This review highlights permafrost characteristics, the influence of cryogenic processes on soil formation, organic carbon accumulation and distribution in permafrost soils, the vulnerability of this carbon upon permafrost thaw, and the role of permafrost soils in a changing climate.
The huge carbon stocks found in soils of the permafrost region are important to the global...
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