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Volume 2, issue 1
SOIL, 2, 49–61, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-49-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
SOIL, 2, 49–61, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-49-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Original research article 21 Jan 2016

Original research article | 21 Jan 2016

Tree species and functional traits but not species richness affect interrill erosion processes in young subtropical forests

S. Seitz et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Oct 2015) by Peter Fiener
AR by Steffen Seitz on behalf of the Authors (08 Nov 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (review by Editor) (10 Nov 2015) by Peter Fiener
AR by Steffen Seitz on behalf of the Authors (20 Nov 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Dec 2015) by Peter Fiener
ED: Publish as is (12 Dec 2015) by Lily Pereg(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Different tree species affect interrill erosion, but a higher tree species richness does not mitigate soil losses in young subtropical forest stands. Different tree morphologies and tree traits (e.g. crown cover or tree height) have to be considered when assessing erosion in forest ecosystems. If a leaf litter cover is not present, the remaining soil surface cover by stones and biological soil crusts is the most important driver for soil erosion control.
Different tree species affect interrill erosion, but a higher tree species richness does not...
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