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SOIL | Volume 5, issue 2
SOIL, 5, 315–332, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-315-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
SOIL, 5, 315–332, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-315-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original research article 15 Nov 2019

Original research article | 15 Nov 2019

Short-range-order minerals as powerful factors explaining deep soil organic carbon stock distribution: the case of a coffee agroforestry plantation on Andosols in Costa Rica

Tiphaine Chevallier et al.
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Cited articles  
Andriamananjara, A., Hewson, J., Razakamanarivo, H., Andrisoa, R. H., Ranaivoson, N., Ramboatiana, N., Razafindrakoto, M., Ramifehiarivo, N., Razafimanantsoa, M. P., Rabeharisoa, L., Ramananantoandro, T., Rasolohery, A., Rabetokotany, N., and Razafimbelo, T.: Land cover impacts on aboveground and soil carbon stocks in Malagasy rainforest, Agr. Ecosyst. Environ., 233, 1–15, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2016.08.030, 2016. 
Aomine, S. and Wada, K.: Differential weathering of volcanic ash and pumice resulting in the formation of hydrated halloysite, American Mineralogist, 47, 1024–1048, 1962. 
Basile-Doelsch, I., Amundson, R., Stone, W. E. E., Masiello, C. A., Bottero, J. Y., Colin, F., Masin, F., Borschneck, D., and Meunier, J. D.: Mineralogical control of organic carbon dynamics in a volcanic ash soil on La Réunion, Eur. J. Soil Sci., 56, 689–703, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2389.2005.00703.x, 2005. 
Batjes, N. H.: Total carbon and nitrogen in the soils of the world, Eur. J. Soil Sci., 65, 4–21, https://doi.org/10.1111/ejss.12115, 2014. 
Beare, M. H., McNeill, S. J., Curtin, D., Parfitt, R. L., Jones, J. S., Dodd, M. B., and Sharp, J.: Estimating the organic carbon stabilisation capacity and saturation deficit of soils: a New Zealand case study, Biogeochemistry, 120, 71–87, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-014-9982-1, 2014. 
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Short summary
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest terrestrial C stock. Andosols of volcanic areas hold particularly large stocks (e.g. from 24 to 72 kgC m−2 in the upper 2 m of soil) as determined via MIR spectrometry at our Costa Rican study site: a 1 km2 basin covered by coffee agroforestry. Andic soil properties explained this high variability, which did not correlate with stocks in the upper 20 cm of soil. Topography and pedogenesis are needed to understand the SOC stocks at landscape scales.
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest terrestrial C stock. Andosols of volcanic areas hold...
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